Eric: This video is brought to you by Sailrite. Visit Sailrite.com for all your project supplies,
tools, and instructions. In this video tutorial we will show you how
to make a cushion for a powerboat. This cushion takes a slanted 35 degree turn,
much like a lounge chair cushion, except that it is not made into three separate cushions
to accommodate the shape, but rather one whole cushion that follows the slanted shape of
the surface it rests on. This video features patterning, sewing, installing
piping, cutting and gluing foam, and much more. At Sailrite we’re equipping you to sew at
home and on the water with DIY tutorial videos and supplies and tools. Let’s get started. Here you can see the old lounge cushion. It was made into three separate sections to
cover the area. Brian: We’re going to make this, rather
than being three cushions, we’re going to make this one continuous cushion that’ll
have shape. We might even work a couple colors into it
to have a little bit of color in it. Eric: Here’s a before and after look. To start our project, we need to do some patterning
of the area on the boat. Cindi, a professional seamstress at Sailrite,
will show us how it’s done. Okay, we are ready to start on this cushion
area right here on Brian’s boat. You can see that it’s made in three separate
pieces right now. We’re going to make this all one cushion
to follow the line of this fiberglass area so that we don’t have these holes right
here. It’s just going to look a lot better than
this one does. So we’re going to show you how to do that
from beginning to end. I’m applying this Strapping Tape to the
base of this cushion so that we can put the Seamstick on top of that and hold the pattern
in place while we make our pattern. Eric: By using Strapping Tape first and then
applying double sided tape on top of it, it will be easier to remove the double sided
Seamstick after we’re done patterning. I’ve got my Dura Skrim Patterning fabric
on here, and I’m going to cut it just a little bit wider so I don’t have to work
with the whole width of this on here. Eric: The transfer paper off the double sided
tape is removed. Then the Dura Skrim Pattern Material is carefully
laid on top and basted in place until it’s perfectly flat on top of our shaped area. I’m going to mark the finished size of my
cushion on this base here, and I don’t want the cushion to come out any farther than the
edge. So I’ve got my yardstick in just a tiny
bit, and I’m going to use that as my straight edge to mark this edge of the cushion. Back here, because we have this extra piece
of padding here, make sure that my Dura Skrim is smoothed out towards the back, and just
hold my marker perpendicular to this padded piece. Eric: If this line is struck down inconsistently,
it can be straightened up when we go to the table and cut it out. This area I want this to take the shape of
this curve right here so I’m going to cut a couple of slits in the Dura Skrim to make
it take that shape. Eric: When cutting relief slits, never cut
in past where you’ll be patterning on the Dura Skrim Pattern Material. This line in the back looks a little bit wobbly
right now, but I can straighten that up as I’m cutting my pattern out. Eric: Now we have a pattern that is exactly
the size that we want the finish cushion to be when we’re done. I’m also going to mark where these snaps
will go in the new cushion. I’m also going to mark that this is the
top of the bottom plate. We’re also going to mark the zipper while
we’re putting our marks on here. We want it to be as close to the back as possible. But because of these snaps, I can’t put
it on this side of the cushion. So we’re going to come out from the snaps
a couple of inches. Eric: We’ll be installing the zipper in
the bottom side of this cushion since the boxing is not straight along the back edge. The zipper will go from about an inch in from
this end all the way up to that end about an inch in. So we can make it as long as possible. Brian wants to use three vinyls on this. This back parts going to be a tan channeling
and then a navy piece and then another tan piece that’s not channeled, just flat vinyl. So we’re going to kind of randomly draw
a line on here until we get it the way we think it looks good. This is definitely personal preference. We’ve made a couple starting points here
and here. Eric: Using this grease pencil will allow
us to remove the marks if we’re not happy. To remove the marks use a rag with water. We used the yellow grease pencil because if
we decide that we want to change this, it’ll wipe right off and you won’t be distracted
by your old lines. I think we have this where we want it so we’re
going to go over it with a marker so that it’s a little bit stronger line. I’m going to mark these with tan, blue and
tan channel. Eric: Tan, blue and channeling. Here’s a look ahead. Now we can remove the patterning material. We’re ready to get our pattern ready for
the vinyl. I’m going to straighten up this back edge
where I had that little piece of padding that was kind of wobbly, and I don’t really want
to cut wobbly pieces out. So I’m going to straighten this up from
this point up here to this point down here. That’s the line I’m going to use for my
finished size. Eric: At this point, we will cut it out only
along the outer edge. For the underside of our cushion we’re going
to use Cushion Underlining Material. We’ll use the pattern to pattern the bottom
plate. Here’s a quick anatomy of the cushion. I’m going to cut out my Cushion Underlining
first. This pattern is going to be cut into three
pieces, and I want to have a solid piece to use to pattern my foam off of. Eric: This video is brought to you by Sailrite.
Visit Sailrite.com for all your project supplies, tools, and instructions. In this video tutorial
we will show you how to make a cushion for a powerboat. This cushion takes a slanted
35 degree turn, much like a lounge chair cushion, except that it is not made into three separate
cushions to accommodate the shape, but rather one whole cushion that follows the slanted
shape of the surface it rests on. This video features patterning, sewing, installing piping,
cutting and gluing foam, and much more. At Sailrite we’re equipping you to sew at home
and on the water with DIY tutorial videos and supplies and tools. Let’s get started.
Here you can see the old lounge cushion. It was made into three separate sections to cover
the area. Brian: We’re going to make this, rather
than being three cushions, we’re going to make this one continuous cushion that’ll
have shape. We might even work a couple colors into it to have a little bit of color in it. Eric: Here’s a before and after look. To
start our project, we need to do some patterning of the area on the boat. Cindi, a professional
seamstress at Sailrite, will show us how it’s done. Okay, we are ready to start on this cushion
area right here on Brian’s boat. You can see that it’s made in three separate pieces
right now. We’re going to make this all one cushion to follow the line of this fiberglass
area so that we don’t have these holes right here. It’s just going to look a lot better
than this one does. So we’re going to show you how to do that from beginning to end.
I’m applying this Strapping Tape to the base of this cushion so that we can put the
Seamstick on top of that and hold the pattern in place while we make our pattern. Eric: By using Strapping Tape first and then
applying double sided tape on top of it, it will be easier to remove the double sided
Seamstick after we’re done patterning. I’ve got my Dura Skrim Patterning fabric
on here, and I’m going to cut it just a little bit wider so I don’t have to work
with the whole width of this on here. Eric: The transfer paper off the double sided
tape is removed. Then the Dura Skrim Pattern Material is carefully laid on top and basted
in place until it’s perfectly flat on top of our shaped area. I’m going to mark the finished size of my
cushion on this base here, and I don’t want the cushion to come out any farther than the
edge. So I’ve got my yardstick in just a tiny bit, and I’m going to use that as my
straight edge to mark this edge of the cushion. Back here, because we have this extra piece
of padding here, make sure that my Dura Skrim is smoothed out towards the back, and just
hold my marker perpendicular to this padded piece. Eric: If this line is struck down inconsistently,
it can be straightened up when we go to the table and cut it out. This area I want this to take the shape of
this curve right here so I’m going to cut a couple of slits in the Dura Skrim to make
it take that shape. Eric: When cutting relief slits, never cut
in past where you’ll be patterning on the Dura Skrim Pattern Material. This line in the back looks a little bit wobbly
right now, but I can straighten that up as I’m cutting my pattern out. Eric: Now we have a pattern that is exactly
the size that we want the finish cushion to be when we’re done. I’m also going to mark where these snaps
will go in the new cushion. I’m also going to mark that this is the top of the bottom
plate. We’re also going to mark the zipper while we’re putting our marks on here. We
want it to be as close to the back as possible. But because of these snaps, I can’t put
it on this side of the cushion. So we’re going to come out from the snaps a couple
of inches. Eric: We’ll be installing the zipper in
the bottom side of this cushion since the boxing is not straight along the back edge. The zipper will go from about an inch in from
this end all the way up to that end about an inch in. So we can make it as long as possible.
Brian wants to use three vinyls on this. This back parts going to be a tan channeling and
then a navy piece and then another tan piece that’s not channeled, just flat vinyl. So
we’re going to kind of randomly draw a line on here until we get it the way we think it
looks good. This is definitely personal preference. We’ve made a couple starting points here
and here. Eric: Using this grease pencil will allow
us to remove the marks if we’re not happy. To remove the marks use a rag with water. We used the yellow grease pencil because if
we decide that we want to change this, it’ll wipe right off and you won’t be distracted
by your old lines. I think we have this where we want it so we’re going to go over it
with a marker so that it’s a little bit stronger line. I’m going to mark these with
tan, blue and tan channel. Eric: Tan, blue and channeling. Here’s a
look ahead. Now we can remove the patterning material. We’re ready to get our pattern ready for
the vinyl. I’m going to straighten up this back edge where I had that little piece of
padding that was kind of wobbly, and I don’t really want to cut wobbly pieces out. So I’m
going to straighten this up from this point up here to this point down here. That’s
the line I’m going to use for my finished size. Eric: At this point, we will cut it out only
along the outer edge. For the underside of our cushion we’re going to use Cushion Underlining
Material. We’ll use the pattern to pattern the bottom plate. Here’s a quick anatomy
of the cushion. I’m going to cut out my Cushion Underlining
first. This pattern is going to be cut into three pieces, and I want to have a solid piece
to use to pattern my foam off of. So before I cut this up for my top plate, I’m going
to cut out my Cushion Underlining with a ¼” seam all the way around the edge. Eric: Use masking tape to secure the patterning
material. The only thing that’s going to get cut on
this piece is to install the zipper and it’s just a slit so it will stay the size that
I cut it right now until it goes into the cushion. Eric: To install the zipper for this application,
we will sew the zipper in place and then just slit it down the middle of the teeth. We’re going to add a ¼” to our finished
size. Eric: This bottom plate will be a ¼” larger
than the actual finished size of the cushion all around the perimeter. This will allow
us to have a plate that is tightly fitted on the bottom side of our cushion. The actual
sewn seam allowance will be a ½”. This will make the plate slightly smaller than
the cushion. So I’m going to mark this with wrong side
because I don’t want to get it turned over. Eric: This will be the inside of the cushion. One other thing I want to note on my Cushion
Underlining pattern is how far the zipper is in, and it’s about 4”, so I can make
a line on the Cushion Underlining also, like I did here. Eric: Cushion Underlining Material will not
unravel. It can be simply cut with scissors. Okay, to remind myself while I’m working
with this piece that I’ve already added a seam to this, I’m going to just write
on each edge. Eric: Later on, we’ll use this to pattern
our foam. This will remind us of this fact. Because this is what we’ll use to pattern
our foam from. Eric: Our top plate will be made from three
different colors. If yours is only one color then cut it to the same size as the bottom
plate you just made. Now I’m ready to cut this piece into three
pieces for the tan, the blue, and the channeling. I’m going to make some reference marks so
that when I sew this together, I have some reference where the pieces should match. Eric: Because our top plate has three different
fabrics that must be sewn together, they will be cut larger than the actual pattern to account
for seam allowance and also shrinkage that naturally occurs during sewing. We’re ready to cut our tan piece out of
the vinyl, and I have the vinyl with the right side down. So I’m going to turn this piece
over so that the right side of this piece is also down. Eric: The writing on the pattern material
is upside down. Put a couple pieces of tape to hold it in
place while I work with it. On this curved part where I’m going to seam it together,
I want to add a ½” for a seam. Out here I’m going to add 1” because I want to
cut this down with the Cushion Underlining piece that we just cut to size, and I want
to leave myself some extra to work with just in case it’s not exact. I don’t want to
try and make this outside edge exact right now. So out here, I’m just adding 1”. Eric: As discussed earlier, this extra 1”
will allow for any shrinkage that may occur when we sew them together. And then on this edge, I’ll make it ½”. Eric: A ½” here because this is the edge
that will be sewn to the opposite panel, and we will use a ½” seam allowance. So here,
she adds ½” all along this edge. Notice that as she marks along the edge of the pattern
material, the clear acrylic ruler is always parallel to the edge of the pattern material,
and she only marks on a plane that is parallel to that edge of the pattern material. Then
it can be cut along those lines that are struck down on the vinyl seating material fabric.
At this point, don’t remove the pattern material that’s been taped on the back of
the fabric. We still need to mark the match up marks. We’ll do that at the end. We’re going to cut the blue piece, and I
have the right side down on the table and the wrong side up. I’m going to tape this
one down and add some to the edges just like I did to the other one. These two curved lines
will get a ½” seam, and this edge right here will get the extra inch and down here
will get the extra inch. Eric: The Dura Skrim Pattern Material is laying
on the table so the words are upside down again. We’re righting on the bottom side
of the fabric. Since the procedure is exactly the same, we’re going to move ahead and
show cutting this out. For the third color, on our cushion, we’ve chosen to use a channeling
fabric. That’s next. So we have the right side down on the table,
and I’ve turned my pattern over. I’m going to draw my 1” allowance out here and a ½”
allowance here where this curve is. Eric: An inch anywhere it’s not seamed together
for any possible shrinkage and a ½” where edges will be sewn together. Okay, all three
of our panels are cut out. Now it’s time to join them up. I have all three pieces cut now with the right
sides down on the table and my pattern’s still attached to the piece. I’m going to
go back and mark my reference points on my pieces before I take the patterns off. So
I can take my patterns off and start sewing my pieces together. Eric: We will sew the tan and blue sections
together using a French Seam, or what is sometimes called a Double Top Stitch. On the underside
of a French Seam, a reinforcing strip of fabric- for us Grosgrain Polyester Binding- is used.
This helps to provide the strength of that seam. If your top plate is a solid section
of fabric, skip the next two chapters. We have our three pieces cut and marked. I’m
going to sew these two pieces together first- right sides together. I’m going to start
down at this end. You can see that our marks are very close. So I’m going to use these
as my guideline as I go down and make sure that they stay close on all the edges. I want
this to be a fairly accurate ½” seam so I’m going to use this magnetic seam guide
and attach it to the base of my machine using the ½” on the seam gauge. Then I’m ready
to stitch. Eric: This will be the first of three stitches.
This first stitch is a ½” from the raw edges of the fabric. She’ll be careful that
the edges are lined up perfectly as she sews along the length of the fabric assembly. She’ll
also ensure that the match up marks are coming out directly on top of each other as she sews
this top plate together. If this assembly didn’t have shape, the match up marks would
not be important. But as you can see here, there is a rounded shape to these two panels
that are being sewn together. So for us keeping the match up marks directly on top of each
other is important. This edge is okay; it should end up like this
with a little bit of extra on the tan. See technically it matches the pattern when you
turn it under like that. Eric: The first stitch is done. Now we’ll
talk about the reinforcement for the bottom side. We want to do a top stitch finish on either
side of this, which is sometimes called a French Seam. In order to do that we need to
flatten out these two seams. I’m going to use this Grosgrain Ribbon and attach the Seamstick
to it and then attach that to the seam to hold it in place while I’m stitching. Eric: This is a 1” Grosgrain Ribbon that’s
available from Sailrite. It will help strengthen this French Seam. Without it, the center stitch
is very weak. Basting it in place will help us to avoid from having to line it up as we
sew. So this will hold the seam in place while
I’m stitching, but it also makes the seam stronger. Eric: It is important to press down the ½”
flanges from the first stitch flat as its being basted. We’ll be sewing closer to the center so
this doesn’t have to be exactly centered on the backside. Eric: Since the top stitch is approximately
a ¼” from the first stitch, the Grosgrain Ribbon does not need to be perfectly centered. Now for this stitching I’m going to stitch
with the edge of the foot along my seam on either side. Eric: Notice the right side of the presser
foot is directly on top of that seam, or first stitch. For a more professional look, go slow
and be sure to guide the fabric so the foot is directly on top of that first stitch. I’m going to turn it around and do the same
thing on the tan side with the edge of the presser foot at the seam line. Eric: By flipping the panel and starting from
the opposite end, we’re still sewing with that first stitch right up against the right
side of the presser foot. This last top stitch completes the French Seam. A few things to
consider: we’re using aV-92 thread (sometimes even heavier threads look best with a French
Seam), or contrasting colored threads. Next we will sew the vinyl channeling fabric to
this assembly. We find that a top stitch does not look as good in channeling fabric. So
we will only place a top stitch in the blue vinyl fabric. We’re ready to sew the channeling piece
to the other two pieces. It goes on this blue edge right here; you can see the curve matches.
One thing we want to be really careful of when we’re sewing on the channeling is because
of the foam in here, you might have a tendency to really stretch it, and we don’t want
to do that. We want to keep it the cut size just like it is now. So we’re going to use
the Seamstick on this and make sure that our marks are lined up while we’re putting
the Seamstick on. I’m also going to stitch with the channeling on the bottom. The underneath
teeth have a tendency to pull the bottom fabric quicker than the top fabric so that’ll help
keep from stretching also. Eric: Just a few moments ago, Cindi called
the batting inside the channeling foam. It’s actually Polyester Batting. When I put this on, I’m putting it as close
to the edge as possible. I have a ½” seam allowed here so I want to keep this within
that ½” seam. Eric: Our sewing seam allowance here will
be a ½” so this ¼” width of Seamstick, or basting tape, will be well away from the
stitch that will be placed in this fabric assembly. That is very important. You would
not want this glue to come in contact with the stitch because when the assembly is turned
right side out that glue would be on the top side, which would not be good. It would collect
dirt and be ugly. So keep that ¼” basting tape well along the outer edge of the fabric
so it’s not sewn through accidentally. This ¼” basting tape will keep the panels in
the appropriate position, but more importantly, for the channeling fabric, it will keep us
from accidentally stretching or shrinking the channeling fabric as it is sewn. Remember
earlier, Cindi talked about the channeling fabric having a batting inside of it, and
unfortunately that batting allows the fabric to be easily stretched. We want it to be consistently
basted along this edge so that there is no stretch. Nice thing about the basting tape,
if you’re not happy, you can peel it up again and reapply it. As she’s basting this
you’ll notice three things: 1. She’s matching up the match up marks as she bastes. 2. She
is not stretching the channeling fabric. She’s trying to ensure that it goes down even all
along the length. 3. She’s matching up the raw edges of both the blue fabric and the
channeling fabric, including this curved area. This was a slightly time consuming procedure,
but as you can see, it came out perfectly. Both this end and the opposite end are exactly
where it should fall. When we lay this down after I’ve got it
pressed with the Seamstick, you can see that the channels look pretty consistent all the
way down. My marks here and my marks here are matching. Down here at the end, we have
that little angle like we had over here. On this end, my edges are even, and I had added
1” to all three of these pieces and they still all match up. So we’re going to stitch
it. Eric: We’ll set up our magnetic guide so
that the seam allowance is again a ½”. Because these two panels are basted together,
we can do this rather quickly. However, we still recommend going nice and slow so that
you’re ½” seam allowance is consistent. To sew this cushion together, we’re using
the world’s best portable walking foot sewing machine, the Sailrite LS-1. It is a straight
stitch heavy duty sewing machine. Sailrite also carries the world famous LSZ-1, which
is a straight stitch and zigzag stitch walking foot sewing machine. Get yours today at www.Sailrite.com. I’m stitching and I’m only going to stitch
on the blue side of this. We did a test panel and we didn’t like it stitched over here.
So I’m going to stitch on the blue side with the edge of the presser foot as my guide
again. As you’re doing this, you want to make sure that your seam is spread open so
you don’t have any folds in the blue. Eric: Cindi is pulling those two panels apart
so that the first stitch is splayed nice and flat and keeping the right side of that presser
foot right along that first stitch. She’s also sewing through the ½” tail on the
underside. We’ll be showing you that at the end to show you exactly what we’re doing,
but we want to be sure that we sew through the ½” tail that the first stitch created. This row of stitching right here has covered,
or secured, both layers of the blue vinyl and the channeling so that makes a really
nice strong seam. The Seamstick, you can’t see it right here, but the Seamstick is inside
here so you’ll never see it and it won’t get stuck on anything else.
We have our pieces all sewn together, and we have a little bit of rippling in the vinyl.
We want this to lay as flat as possible before we cut it to the size of our pattern. So I’m
going to use this strapping tape on the table and then put the Seamstick on top of it so
that we can hold this firm on the table before we cut the pattern, and try and flatten out
a little bit of this. Eric: Strapping tape will be placed on the
tabletop along all four sides of the plate. Then double sided tape will be placed on top
of the strapping tape so that it can easily be removed from the table after we’re done.
The top plate will be placed on top of this and smoothed out so it’s nice and flat.
That’s what this basting tape will be used for. The culprit of the wrinkling is due to
the fact that the panels had to be sewn together and there’s a lot of curve in those panels.
So we do expect a little bit of wrinkling. We’re going to try to work out the wrinkles
and not stretch the fabric too much, but try to smooth out the wrinkles and baste it to
the tabletop so that when we place our bottom plate, which is cut exactly to the size that
we want this top plate, we can achieve that same size. We have the Seamstick down on the table and
our piece that we made on top of it. You can see that right here, I want to try and eliminate
that if I can. So if I lift it up off the Seamstick and just stretch it just a little
bit, it works that extra vinyl out. Eric: With the top plate flat we can use the
bottom plate that already has the ¼” built in all around the perimeter. We’ll use that
as the pattern. So the next step will be to lay the pattern
on and trace around it for the size of my top plate. You can see that down here we had
added 1”. So there’s the inch that we added and the vinyl has taken up just a little
bit in stitching, and that’s normal. That’s why we added the extra inch around so we’d
have plenty to work with. Same thing down here; I’m about ¼” short. So it’s important
to add that extra inch because you’re going to lose some just stitching it together.
I have my piece all secured to the table with the Seamstick, and this is the size that I
want the top plate to be also. So I’m going to go around this piece and mark it with a
pencil so I can cut my top plate from this pattern that we created. Eric: After we’re done marking around it,
we can remove it from the tabletop and remove any double sided tape that may be stuck to
the panel. Then we’ll cut around. Because we’re cutting vinyl fabric, we do not need
to use a hotknife. The edges will not unravel. Since this powerboat lounge cushion has a
top end that takes a slanted upward turn then transitions horizontally at the extreme top,
we need to do some special patterning for the boxing. Back at the boat, we’re using
cardboard and tracing a line. Here Cindi will explain it. This is our pattern for our boxing on our
cushion, and this is the part that we’re going to use from here up. We’ll add a seam
out here, and when we decide the width of the boxing we’ll add a seam up here so the
boxing will take the same shape as the boat. Eric: As a general guideline to determine
the width of the boxing to cut, measure your foam thickness. For us, we are using a 3”
foam. To this measurement add between a ¼” and ¾”. This is the pattern that we drew off the frame
of the boat for the shape. We’re going to cut our boxing at 3 ½” so I’m going to
mark that here so we can trim this piece down to the correct size. Eric: Keep in mind that thinner cushions look
best with more allowance added and thicker cushions look best with less. Basically adding
less of an allowance will allow the seams to roll into the edges of the cushion. We
are cutting our boxing to 3 ½” in width. We have our piece of cardboard and we brought
it back to the boat to check it and make sure that our angles are correct. I want to mark
the corners while I have it here at the boat. Eric: Cindi cut the cardboard out. It’s
3 ½” in width from that bottom line. Cindi is marking exactly where the edges of the
cushion should fall. So there at the top and here at the bottom edge. So this is the front box, the right side.
I’m going to trim off the top so that I can move it back here and measure for my back
boxing. It still fits really well up here into the corner. Eric: For the boxing up against the port side
of the boat, she places that strip there and she’ll place a mark here at the bottom edge
since it’s curved. So that’s where my back boxing should come
to. I’m going to mark this side back boxing right side. This is the right side of the
fabric, wrong side of the fabric on the back boxing and right side of the fabric, wrong
side of the fabric on the front boxing. Eric: Back at the sewing table she marks the
opposite edges where the finished cushion should stop for the front and rear boxing. We’re getting ready to cut the boxing strips
for our cushion. Because of the angle down here, I’m going to put a few lines on this
piece to get a proper measurement for the boxing in the front and the back. Eric: This is the wrong side, or the inside,
of the Cushion Underlining Fabric. So I’m making a line a ½” in on three
sides. Eric: This line indicates where the ½”
seam will be placed on this the bottom plate. Now she can measure with the fabric tape measure. So to get the length of my boxing for this
front, this angle and this side, I can start up here at the very edge, which will allow
my ½” seam. Down here, I want to measure ½” beyond where those two lines cross.
So my boxing for this side will be 63”. Eric: She will write these all down on the
cardboard strip she cut out. You’ll see that a little bit later on. It’ll be 18” down here, which is a ½”
longer from where my lines cross and ½” longer on this side. You can see that it doesn’t
actually come all the way out to the edge of my pattern. Eric: These measurements are what the length
of the boxing should be. That includes for the ½” seam allowance. This one measures 55 ¼” to where my lines
cross so this one will be cut at 55 ¾”. This one is 16 ½”. Eric: As discussed earlier, all those measurements
should be written down someplace. She did it on the cardboard. We’re going to cut out our front and back
boxing, and I’m going to draw on the vinyl again. So I’m going to turn it over with
the right side facing the table. We’ve already added our seam allowance to this piece so
I’m going to just trace around it. Eric: Our foam was 3” wide. We added a ½”
to that so this boxing width is 3 ½” overall. She’s tracing around it now. I’m going to leave it a little bit long
in case we need to make any adjustments down here. We can measure the exact length after
we cut it out. I need two of these- one for the front and one for the back. Eric: Notice that the cardboard strip has
been flipped, but she positioned it differently so she could save on fabric. Then it is simply
cut out with shears. So from our measurements over here, we still
need a 16 ½” piece and an 18” piece, 3 ½” wide. This is the front boxing. We
want to make sure that we get this angle in the right place so I’m going to label these
with front and back. So our front measurement was 55 ¾” and the back one needs to be
63”. I’m going to measure across the edge of this at about ½” in where the seam would
be. I’m going to kind of walk the tape measure standing up because I think I get a more accurate
measurement that way. So that’s where I would need to cut this piece off. I’m going
to do the same thing with the front piece. Started at the very edge of your cut and just
walk it along at about a ½” in. This one is 55 ¾” so that’s where I will
cut this one off. I’m going to use the mark that I made and square it with this seam right
here and that’s where I’ll cut this off. Eric: That clear acrylic ruler is awesome.
Great! We have all the boxing strips cut to the appropriate width and length. We’re
now ready to apply our piping to the top plate, which is what we desire. If you do not desire
piping, you can skip this chapter. Sailrite has a lot of prefabricated vinyl pipings in
stock for your next cushion project. Okay, I’m going to apply the piping to the
edges of the top plate. The foot is going to guide the piping for me. I’m going to
keep the piping edge along the cut edge of the cushion. I’m not going to stretch the
channeling out as I go. I’m going to try to keep it nice and smooth and not put any
tension on the channeling piece. Eric: This is the back edge of the cushion
near the center. Notice she’s left about 4”-5” unsewn at the end so it can be joined
up later on. We do not want to stretch or pull the channeling fabric or shrink it up
as we sew so she’s being careful. Because of that batting, the channeling fabric has
a tendency to pull or shrink depending on how it’s handled. So handle it carefully
so that it does not change its shape. At the corner, you’ll notice that she buries her
needle a ½” away from the opposite edge, lifts the presser foot, rolls the assembly
around, lowers the presser foot, and then continues to sew. The Sailrite Ultrafeed Sewing
Machines have a welting, or cording, tunnel that is built right in to the standard foot.
If you’re sewing with a different sewing machine, you may need to install a cording
foot to sew this piping in place. The tunnel allows for the piping to be fed so that the
stitch is placed right next to the cording channel. Here she’s coming to another corner.
She’ll roll the balance wheel over by hand so the needle is buried in the fabric about
a ½” from the other edge, lift the presser foot, roll the assembly, lower the presser
foot, and then continue to sew. This prefabricated piping has slits in the tail edge. Those slits
allow it to take turns rather nicely. We’re going to skip ahead to a corner that is rather
sharp- more than 90 degrees. Watch what Cindi does here. When I get to this corner, this is a very
sharp angle, so I am going to make a few cuts in the piping to go around this corner. Eric: These extra slits will allow the piping
to take this sharp turn even better. Same process…bury the needle a ½” from the
edge, lift the presser foot, roll the assembly, position the piping, lower the presser foot,
and continue to sew. Notice how those slits made that corner come out even better. We’ll
now skip ahead to where the piping has to be joined together. Now when I get back to where I started, I’m
going to cut this off a couple of inches beyond the other edge and open this up. Eric: To aid in splaying open the piping,
she will use her scissors and force it in there to break the glue seal at the end. Then
she can peel it back exposing the foam cording inside of the vinyl cover. I want to cut the cording itself off to match
the other piece of cording. I’m going to cut this piece at a diagonal with my scissors
kind of angled to keep as much color on the vinyl as possible. Tuck that inside and wrap
it around and finish stitching. Eric: Now our piping has been installed to
the top plate. We’ll now proceed to making the zipper on the bottom plate, and also straps
for the snaps that will secure it to the boat. I’m going to tape my pattern back together
so we can mark where the snaps go and where we want to put the zipper on this. This is
something that you can do before you take it all apart. We didn’t think of that. We’re
ready to mark where our snaps go on this piece. This is the top of the bottom plate, or the
inside of the bottom plate. So I’m going to flip it over and mark my snaps on the outside.
Remember we’ve added ¼” all the way around this. Eric: Remember back on the boat we placed
marks where each snap is located. We’re going to use this pattern to indicate where
they go on the bottom plate. Then the zipper we want to mark on the wrong
side so I’m going to flip it back over to the wrong side. We know that that’s about
4” in from the back edge. To install the zipper, I’m going to just lay the zipper
teeth on that pencil line a little bit beyond my mark there and run the edge of the foot
right along the edge of the zipper teeth. Eric: When sewing a zipper down, we do not
want that stitch to be any closer than about 1/8” away from the teeth. Otherwise the
slider puller will be difficult to pull up and down to open or close the zipper. Once
she has one side secured, she will sew the other side by flipping the panel and starting
from the opposite end. Here she cuts the zipper to the appropriate length. Now watch her flip
the panel and she’ll start from the opposite end. And then I’m going to turn it around and
go down the other side the same way. Eric: She does this so that she’s sewing
that zipper on with the same side of the presser foot, the right side. Thus the stitch is equal
from side to side as presser feet may be different in width from the right side to the left side.
It is always important to install the slider before you put stops on the zipper. Here she
pushes the slider in position so that the slider puller is facing the fabric. Now she
can install stops. I’m going to add these little pieces at
each end of the zipper. This will be my zipper stop. Eric: This is a scrap piece of the Cushion
Underlining Fabric that’s been folded in half. Then she sews several times over the
teeth being careful not to have the needle hit one of the zipper teeth and deflect. This
is a Sailrite Ultrafeed LS-1 Sewing Machine. It’s a very heavy duty sewing machine. If
you’re using a home sewing machine, you may want to walk the stitching over the zipper
teeth. We don’t have to worry about it with this machine. Now I can slide my zipper down and out of
the way so that I can cut on this line. So I’m going to fold it in half like that to
get it started and then turn it over and cut down the center of my stitching. Eric: Installing a zipper this way is a quick
and easy way to install a zipper for a cushion. Because we’re using Cushion Underlining
Fabric on the bottom side, we do not have to worry about the slit unraveling or the
fabric unraveling. So if you want a quick way to install a zipper, follow this technique. We’re getting ready to apply the straps
for the snaps on the bottom of this cushion. I want to cut these about 4” long. I’m
going to need one for each of the dots that I have here on my pattern. We’re cutting
it 4” so that your hand fits inside it so that you can get underneath there and apply
the snap. I’m going to use the hotknife to seal the edge of it. Eric: By using the Sailrite Edge Hotknife,
we don’t have to worry about the edges of the webbing unraveling. We like to use 1 ½”
width webbing so that we can place the snap more easily and ensure that we’re going to
have the snap in the webbing. When we apply these little straps here, we’re
going to lay them over the dot and put them the direction that it’s going to be easiest
for us to get our hand in and snap it down. This is actually the back of the cushion when
it goes together. They’ll all go this way- front and back- until we get down here to
this corner. This one, it won’t lay over the zipper. I’ll make this one a little
bit smaller, but it’ll go along this angle so that we can get our hand in from this angle
to snap this one on. I’m going to use the double sided tape just to hold this in place
while I stitch it a little bit on each end. When I put this one on, we’re going to connect
it into the seam so that we still have enough room to get our fingers in there and snap
it down. The rest of them will just be centered over where I made the mark. So I’m going
to take it over to the machine and stitch here and here. Eric: Be sure to do reversing several times
to secure this webbing in place. Otherwise, it may not hold. We probably should’ve done
even more there than what Cindi did. I would do it about four times back and forth over
top of that position. We have all the straps applied to the bottom
plate of our cushion. This is actually the right side of it. These are big enough that
we can stick our hand in there. There’ll be a snap right here to snap onto the boat
with all of these. Eric: Now that our bottom plate is ready,
we can move on to joining the boxing and sewing it to the plate. Now we’re going to sew the boxing strips
together and then apply them to the top plate. Eric: The boxing should be positioned around
the cushion as shown. This way it cuts down on confusion. Then grab the corresponding
boxing and lay it over the top of the other so outside surfaces are facing each other.
Then take it to the sewing machine. We will sew a ½” seam allowance making sure the
ends are butted up to each other. Do some reversing at the beginning and the end of
the stitching. Once these three sections of boxing are sewn together, we’ll take it
back and lay it around our top and bottom plates to determine where the next boxing
strips should be joined. This is a rather important step. It helps you to keep everything
orientated appropriately. Remember, our boxing has a slightly odd shape because of the lounge
chair effect of this cushion. We want it to go the right direction. So we do this to confirm
that everything will be sewn together exactly as it should. Now we know how those pieces
should be sewn. We take them to the sewing machine and create that ½” seam at the
end of each one of these boxing strips. That will join all four strips together as one
to make a round circle. Let’s move ahead and show you what it looks like when they’re
all sewn together. This is a good spot to make sure you haven’t
twisted any of these and they’re all going the right direction. We’re going to use
this ¼” Seamstick on this seam. It’s not absolutely necessary to do this, but because
of the angles on this cushion, I think it would be easier to hold everything in place
while I’m working with it. You don’t really want to put pins in vinyl. So this is a good
way to secure everything so it stays in place while you’re stitching all the way around
the perimeter of this cushion. I’m putting it out at the edge because I don’t want
it to be anywhere where it could possibly show when the cushion is finished. So I’m
keeping it away from the seam. Eric: Because our cushion has a lot of shape,
or slanted sections, we recommend using this basting tape to pre-secure the boxing to the
plates. Why? This will ensure that all our corners come out perfectly, and if they do
not, we can re-baste it prior to sewing it together, saving time and also ensuring that
when we sew, it will be perfect. Where a seam was placed on the boxing should be the exact
corner. So she’s being careful to line up that seam right at the exact corner of the
plate. It is sometimes helpful to take scissors and cut into the corner so that it goes around
the corner nicer. Do not go past the ½” seam allowance that will be taken up when
we take it to the sewing machine and sew. We don’t want that slit to go beyond that.
Here you can see the boxing that takes a gradual slanted curve. We’ll match that up and baste
it together there. We will show most of the process of basting this boxing to the plate
because there is a lot of shape in here. Here she has to make another slit, and that slit
is a little bit deeper than a ½”. That’s a slight mistake. It’ll probably come out
alright, but we’d rather not go that deep. She’ll continue to baste all around the
perimeter making sure the corners match up perfectly. If they do not, she’ll peel it
apart and re-baste. This corner is not a 90 degree turn so she’s going to skip that
and go to where a corner is sharper, or deeper, than 90 degrees. Gradual corners are harder
to match up; this one is not. Cuts a few slits on both sides of that seam that joins the
boxing together and then make sure that that stitch is right at that corner. Now she can
go the opposite direction and baste it to that gradual corner here. When she goes around
this corner you’ll notice there’s too much fabric. Watch what Cindi does to deal
with that issue. You can see that we have a little bit of extra
vinyl right here so what I’m going to do about that is lift it up off of the Seamstick
and I’m going to adjust this seam right here a little bit. This isn’t exactly a
square corner; I rounded this corner off. So this seam can come around the edge just
a little bit. So I’m going to take it back to the machine, leave everything stuck that
is stuck right now, and just take this seam in just a little bit to compensate for the
extra that’s shown up right there. Eric: This is one of the major advantages
to pre-basting boxing to plates, especially when there’s a lot of shape like this. We
can take out the excess just by moving that stitch that joins those two boxing pieces
together, about ¼” inside the first stitch. This will resolve that excess fabric that
you saw earlier. Watch. So I’m going to trim this extra off so it’s
not quite so bulky in there and then attach it to the Seamstick. Eric: Notice now the excess fabric is gone
and everything lays perfect just as we want. Now we still have more basting to do so let’s
go to work on the other side, which is the back side of this cushion. This angle’s
a little hard to see so we’re going to reposition it. We’re still working on the back side.
We’ll create a slit there, but not so deep. That’s much better than the other side where
we went too deep in the slit. Look at that! Almost perfect. That side we had to do nothing.
It was exactly what it should be. Now we’ll position it under the sewing machine’s
foot, and the cording tunnel is built into the Sailrite Ultrafeed LS-1 Sewing Machine.
So since it’s all basted in place, we just need to sew around the entire perimeter, and
we can do this rather quickly just keeping that cording in the tunnel. You can’t see
the cording, but the sewing machine does a pretty good job of keeping everything in place.
You still have to guide it; it’s not fool proof. As long as you guide it carefully,
your cushion should come out beautifully. Here we’re going to come to that curve in
the boxing and watch what she does there. She will have to twist this assembly slightly
at that curve. Notice that she pivots it slightly then continues to sew to the corner. When
she gets to the corner, she will bury her needle and turn the corner. She is re-basting
a little bit there. It looks like she could position it a little bit better. That’s
not uncommon, especially when you do any kind of basting. When you reach a corner, if you
feel like your corner could be better, re-baste before you sew. Needle’s buried, foot’s
up, foot gets lowered and she continues to sew. Again we’re using the Sailrite Ultrafeed
LS-1 Sewing Machine- the world’s best portable walking foot sewing machine. When you’re
done sewing, it’s not a bad idea to turn your assembly right side out to inspect the
corners. If your stitch is too far from a corner, you can always put it back into the
sewing machine and resew it again. As long as your sewing doesn’t go into the piping,
you’re good. Nobody will see the re-stitching that may be required for your cushion. I have the boxing all sewn to the top plate,
and I’m going to use the Seamstick again on the bottom plate. I’m going to apply
it to the right side close to the edge. Eric: The process…exactly like we did before.
Basting tape will be used to pre-baste this bottom plate to the boxing. Outside surfaces
are facing each other. Match up corners basted around. Not much explanation is needed here.
The process is exactly the same, except for the fact that you’re having to work with
the boxing off the edge of the table. We’ll show this basting process in double time now. Nice! On this seam I don’t have the cording
to run through the tunnel and keep my ½” seam even all the way around so I’m going
to put the seam guide back on at a ½”. I’m going to stitch with the vinyl on top
so that I can see what’s going on when I get to these corners. Eric: We can sew around this rather quickly
because everything’s basted in place. We’ll sew around the entire perimeter doing the
same procedure we did when we reach a corner- bury the needle, lift the foot, turn the assembly,
lower the foot, and then continue to sew around. Let’s move on. Here we’re rounding the
last corner and coming to where we began our stitching. We’ll just sew a few inches over
that and we are done. Now we can open up the zipper and turn the
assembly right side out. The cushion cover is complete. We still need to install snaps,
but before we do that, we need to cut and glue the sections of foam together to accommodate
the shape of this powerboat lounge cushion. We’ll go back to the boat to cut our foam
to the approximate size of our opening, slightly oversize. We’re going to use this Dry Fast Foam for
this cushion. You can see right here that we’ve seamed a couple pieces together. You
can glue these together easily and it doesn’t cause any problems as they’re used. So you’ve
got the cushion laid on the main part of the bench. This part back here I’ve squared
up so it fits snug against the side of the boat. I’m just going to take a marker and
draw a line on the bottom side of the foam that follows the boat. Eric: The side plate has been removed so when
we trace this foam, it’ll be a little bit oversized and we want that. We want it to
be oversized so that we can make final calculations with our actual pattern when we’re done
gluing it all together. Up here in this area, I’m going to cut an
angle on this piece at this end and this end, and I’m going to cut this piece square or
straight and this piece square or straight. This one is going to have the angles in it
to make this angle here. Eric: This is actually old Dry Fast Foam that
we found here at Sailrite that’s a 3” thickness. We can cut it easily with a kitchen
knife. Remember, it’s slightly oversized. We’ll be cutting it yet again with the pattern
later on. Now I can use this scrap piece for this small
piece up here. Eric: It is common and customary to glue sections
of foam together. Typically most manufacturers of cushions do not throw much foam away. They
will take sections and glue it together when necessary. You can hardly tell that there’s
a seam when the cushion cover is placed over the foam. So do this and expect it when you
make your own cushions. Remember, we removed the padded side plate so this foam is actually
oversized, even though it doesn’t look like it. Okay, we’re going to use this scrap piece
of foam for this area right here. First I’m going to cut it to the correct width, and
just draw a line underneath again with my marker. Now I’m ready to draw these angles
here and here. So make sure that this piece is where it needs to be out here on the end,
and that this piece is where it needs to be. Eric: With those pieces lined up with that
angle, she’ll hold that middle piece of foam up to the edges then use her Sharpie
marker and mark the angles that she needs to create in this section of foam. Here you
can see it through the dirty glass. I’m going to cut one angle on this and test
it and make sure it’s okay. So I know that this comes right out at the very edge. So
I’m going to lay my square in here where this mark comes to and square it up and draw
my line here. Then from that line I can draw a line out to this corner. Now when I cut
this, I want to cut it with this black line towards me so I can see where I’m at and
do my best to keep the blade at the back angle here. Eric: This is a good way to cut a wedge. The
wedge that she cuts is not perfect, but it’s good enough. Foam does not need to be cut
exactly perfectly square. You’ll notice that when the cover is done, even if the foam
is slightly uneven on the edges, it still will look great. I’m a little bit thick right there. I’m
going to test the fit on this before I cut the top angle. So I’m just going to sit
it in here and make sure that everything is where I want it to be down here. It looks
like a really good fit right here at this corner, and it looks like once we put the
glue on, that’s going to work really well. It does not have to be exact. Once you put
the glue on, it’s going to pull anything together that’s not cut perfectly straight,
and then once you put the cushion cover on, it’s all going to hold it in place. Eric: Now the second foam is not right on
the edge so she’ll place a mark on this side, and there’s a mark on the other side.
She’ll try to follow that as she cuts it now with the electric kitchen knife. You can see right here I’ve got a little
bit of a hole from cutting the foam not quite at the right angle. So if you wanted to, this
is the angle that I cut off down here, and it actually fits really well to fill in that
little area. So you could also do that if you felt like you wanted to fill that in.
That would also work. No one’s ever going to know that you glued this foam together.
It’s going to work just as well as if it was all one piece. Eric: Sailrite recommends using 3M General
Trim Adhesive to glue Dry Fast and Polyurethane Foam together. We’re ready to glue our pieces together.
We decided to use this little piece to fill in that hole. So I’m just going to put glue
on both sides and add this piece first. Eric: As you can see she’s already glued
some of it. We didn’t get to show that on film. So she’s just applying a little bit
more. We have this paper on the boat so that we
don’t get glue all over the boat seat. Eric: Be sure to follow the instructions on
the spray adhesive. We recommend the solvent evaporate before gluing sections together.
Typically that’s 1-4 minutes. You should be able to feel for when the glue becomes
tacky with your finger and that’s the time to glue it together. However, Dry Fast Foam
is such a porous material that the solvents will still be allowed to evaporate, even if
you do not wait. We still recommend waiting 1-4 minutes. Spray both surfaces for good
adhesion. Even when foam is glued together not so well, it’ll still hold together well
when the cover is applied. So don’t worry if it’s not bonded perfectly.
We recommend that you allow your foam to dry for several hours before patterning again,
or stuffing into the cushion cover, if that’s the next step. We have all the pieces glued, and I’m just
going to keep working with it to make sure it stays together, and it makes a nice smooth
seam. We’re ready to cut our foam to size. I’ve got the pattern laid on here and this
top corner matched up. We know that this point is the exact size, and we know that this point
is the exact size. So I’m trying to keep it in line the best I can with my cardboard.
I’m going to go around and just make a mark around the perimeter of this pattern, and
then I’ll do my measurements to get the foam a little bit bigger. Eric: This is the original pattern, and it
is what we want the desired finished cushion to be when completed. However, we want the
foam to be 1% larger on both dimensions. So after she marks this along the edge of the
pattern material, she will add a little to each side to accommodate the 1% general guideline
that Sailrite recommends for cutting foam. You can see why I needed to hold this up to
go along with my pattern because when I lay it down, it actually changes shape. I’m
going to remove my pattern now and add the 1% to all the sides. Eric: Let’s discuss the 1% extra factor
that we used for a general guideline for cutting the foam to size. We want the cushion cover
to fit snuggly over the foam. That’s how we made it. So because of that fact, the cushion
cover will compress the foam slightly. But we do not want the foam to shrink too much,
and thus not fit properly in the area it will be used in. So we will add 1% to both dimensions
of the foam to help the cushion to be firmly fitted and to keep it from being too small
for the area it was designed to fit in. This illustration is our example. Here you can
see Cindi using the Clear Acrylic Ruler to add the 5/8” and the ½”. Now you can
use an electric kitchen knife to cut the foam out, or here we’re using the Acu-Cutter
350, available from Sailrite. Once the foam is cut to size, it’s now time to insert
the foam inside the cushion cover. Unzip the zipper and start pushing the foam into the
cover. You’ll need to work the corners of the cushion by inserting your hand and pushing
the foam into the corners. We will not show this entire process. Cindi to Eric: Does it look like I’m being
tortured yet? Eric to Cindi: Yeah it does.
Cindi to Eric: Good. That’s what happens when you work at Sailrite! Lol Eric: It is always a good idea to take the
cushion to the boat to determine where the snaps should be installed on the underside
of our cushion. We’re ready to see how this fits. Looks
like it’s going to work really well. This panel will be replaced eventually. So we need
to mark where our snaps are going to go. We can lift this up and get our finger in there
and get a pencil in there and put a dot right where the snap needs to go in. Eric: We will only mark a few of the straps
here where the actual stud of the snap is located on the webbing strap. Then we’ll
take it back to our sewing table and use the pattern. So we are able to use those for reference
now, and we’ll use the pattern that we made to mark all the rest of them in back. Eric: If you’ve not yet removed the strapping
tape and double sided tape that you used for patterning, do that. We took the cushion to the boat and marked
a few of these snaps on the boat so I want to mark these on the right side so we can
see them. Then I’m going to lay the pattern back on it and mark the rest of them. Eric: We marked three positions on the boat.
Now we’ll take our pattern and lay it over the top so that those three that we marked
on the boat are directly over the dot on the pattern material. Then we’ll mark the rest.
To install the button and the socket, we’ll use two systems. First, the Snaprite System
then the Pres N Snap. To use a Snaprite System, push a mandrel through the center of the socket
die. Then push a snap socket on top of that die until it snaps into position. Insert a
Snaprite button into this button die. The button die has been screwed onto a standard
riveting tool. Then push the mandrel through the location on the webbing. Push the snap
button’s barrel over the mandrel then depress the lever of the riveting tool a few times
until the snap is securely set into position. The mandrel does not necessarily need to break.
Once it feels firmly installed and you can remove the tool and the bottom die, your snap
is installed. Now let’s use the Pres N Snap System and show you how to use that tool.
Insert the button snap into the die. Then install the socket onto the opposite die.
It snaps into position. Locate it over the position that you desire the snap to be installed
in the webbing. The Pres N Snap Tool punches a hole through the webbing at the same time
as it installs the snap. One squeeze of the lever and your snap is installed. You can
purchase the Snaprite System or the Pres N Snap Tool from Sailrite today. Using the system
you purchased, install the remainder of the snaps.
Our cushion is now complete. Coming up next is the materials list and the tools we used
to build this cushion. Cushions like this can be made from a variety of outdoor fabrics,
including Morbern Seabrook Marine Quality Vinyl and other brands like Naugahyde Vinyl.
If you prefer, the same methods can be used with woven fabrics like Sunbrella Marine Grade
or Geobella Fabric from Sailrite. Other great tutorial videos that are related to this one
are coming soon. Click on a video to see when it is available. For more free videos like
this, be sure to check out the Sailrite website or subscribe to the Sailrite YouTube Channel.
It’s your loyal patronage to Sailrite that makes these free videos available. Thanks
for you loyal support. I’m Eric Grant, and from all of us here at Sailrite, thanks for
watching.