On this visit to the Film
Lounge, a documentarian looks into the world of
cheese, an artist animates his hallucinations, a
dancer responds to being seen, Iowa becomes home to
a comedy series, a lost boy confronts many
possible futures and a cowboy seeks revenge in
a stylized music video. Strap yourself in
for a bumpy ride. It’s The Film Lounge. Funding for The Film
Lounge has been provided by Produce Iowa,
state office of media production, building a
statewide network of support for the film
community in Iowa. More information on
how you can connect is available at
produceiowa.com. The Gilchrist Foundation,
founded by Jocelyn Gilchrist, furthering the
philanthropic interests of the Gilchrist family in
wildlife and conservation, medical care and social
services, the arts and public broadcasting
and disaster relief. Bravo Greater Des Moines,
investing in arts, culture and heritage non-profit
organizations throughout Central Iowa. And, Iowa Arts Council,
empowering Iowa to build and sustain culturally
vibrant communities by cultivating creativity,
learning and participation in the arts. Learn more at
iowaculture.gov. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Thomas Johnson: The film that I submitted,
along with my team, for Film Lounge is called
Marieke and it’s about Marieke Penterman who
emigrated from the Netherlands when she was
in probably her mid-20s and over the course of the
last ten plus years has very much built kind of
like a gouda cheesemaking empire in Thorp,
Wisconsin. And so in terms of
cheesemakers in the world she’s one of the most
prominent of those. So that’s what
the film is about. When it comes to the
making of cheese it very much is its own subculture
and it’s one of those things that I didn’t know
that much about before I went into it. Obviously you do your
research and you try to get a feel for what goes
into it, the process, but one of the things that we
wanted to do with the film is to explain this
process for people. So, with any documentary,
with any film, you want it to be entertaining,
you want it to be enlightening, but with
this one we wanted there to be a certain
educational component where people learned a
little bit about the process. And so I think that we’ve
done a pretty nice job of mixing those various
things together. Johnson: One thread that
has kind of become clear in my recent film work
is just this idea of creativity and making that
a central component of a person’s life. And a lot of people will
say I’m not creative, I don’t have that energy,
but I think that there’s something creative
in all of us. And my hope is that when
people watch my films that they can kind of take a
little bit of that away and think about how they
could apply it to their own lives. ♪♪ One night I was
tossing and turning and I heard a cow in the
background and I thought, well I want to start my
own business, they have beautiful Wisconsin dairy
milk here right on the farm and I’m missing
my gouda from Holland. So I woke up my husband
and said, honey, I think I know what we should do,
I think we should start making our own
cheese, our own gouda. And like every good
husband he says, yes dear, let’s talk about
it tomorrow. So he fell back to sleep
and my wheels were turning and that’s where our next
adventure and new passion started. ♪♪ Cows are
just like humans. So when I walk between the
cows you will see some will interact a little bit
more than others, some are nice, some are more
outgoing, some are rude, they’re just like people. They all have their own
character and it’s funny. But in general you can
see because if you walk through our barn you will
see different breeds of cows. So we have mainly
Holsteins and then we have Brown Swiss cows and we
have a mixture and then we have some where a Holstein
is a little bit more like hey let’s shake hands, who
are you, that’s where a Brown Swiss says hey buddy
and keeps hugging type of cow. So we really enjoy seeing
the different breeds. And the cow is still, it’s
not just a cow, it’s a personality. ♪♪ When we started
this cheese adventure we wanted to make a
traditional gouda and for us it was very important
to use old world methods that are very
traditional to Holland. So when we got the idea to
start making gouda cheese I traveled back to Holland
and I went to this lady that tends cows and she
was the first one to see me, to show me these old
methods that are still using in our
cheesemaking process. Some of those methods
would be you wash the curds, that is one of the
traditional ways of making gouda. You don’t often hear you
wash the curds and whey, with gouda you wash
the curds in water. Another very essential way
true to the Dutch gouda recipe is that you don’t
put salt on by hand but you actually let the
cheese soak up its own salt. Another way is
the aging process. American cheese often gets
vacuum packed and put in a cooler versus the gouda
way of making it, so it comes out of the rind, it
goes into a cheese and what we do then is we hand
brush kind of a paint onto the cheese that dries up
like a skin around the cheese that will let the
cheese breathe because it’s a living organism. Cheese will lose moisture
during the aging process. So this coating will let
the moisture come through. And then we need wooden
shelves to help enhance the whole aging
process of the cheese. So the moisture of the
cheese, the wooden shelf helps us regulate a little
bit the aging process because it will capture
the moisture of the cheese. So if it’s dry in the
area it will release the moisture and when it’s
humid it will capture some moisture. The wooden shelves are
very essential but you need the right protocols
to make sure that you have a very safe product and
with the right protocols it’s a very safe way of
aging the cheese, it has been done for generations
and it’s a very essential part of true methods that
we use in Holland and we wanted to take to
Thorp, Wisconsin. ♪♪ I think at this
moment we have more than 30 awards and so we have
been very blessed that way. But it’s that feedback on
the floor or at shows, it’s kind of funny when
they put a piece of cheese in their mouth and you
know how they just grab a piece of cheese and they
go, they keep walking. And then we always say
wait, wait for it. And then they stop and
then they go back, they walk back, what kind
of cheese was that? And they want more and
they want to know more about it. So that’s kind of funny. ♪♪ What do I feel
when I walk into the aging room seeing all
those wheels? What do I feel when I come
home and I can put my feet up and I eat a
piece of cheese? I feel like it’s not just
a piece of cheese, it’s something you inhale and
I’ve had a lot of fun moments already with
having cheese on the table, I’m proud. I’m amazed what this
cheese has brought us so far. I never thought when I
started this adventure I thought I would just make
a couple of times a week cheese and I would do this
to get an income for my family and being able to
stay at home, and along the road I think
something more came. Yeah, I’m very, very super
proud, all the people that came along that helped us
make this piece of cheese and the people that I got
to know, the opportunities that it gave me. That piece of
cheese is kick ass. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Benjamin
Gardner: I’m actually a painter and I have a
background in furniture and woodworking. But my sort of schooling
was in painting and drawing. And so now I’ve kind of
done sort of mixed media installations and that is
where filmmaking comes from is a part of sort
of these broader, bigger mixed media installations
that I’m working on. Hallucination Dream
Sequence is a film composed of vignettes I
would say and emails. The emails are a
conversation between two people about sort of
stages of going to sleep and the sort of animated
vignettes are drawings that I made and used
a process called data bending to animate them. Gardner: So I think the
film here in particular came from a bunch of
different things but I was mainly not getting enough
sleep because I had a very young daughter. And so I started
having sort of visual hallucinations
a little bit. And so I started thinking
about how I could talk about that through images
and no sort of static image sort of
would suffice. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ (silence) ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ (silence) (silence) ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ (silence) ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Kaitlyn
Busbee: Introspect is a solo improvisational dance
film that I created with a dancer Elizabeth June
Bergman, and it delves into the psyche of one’s
self and the idea of being a person being looked upon
and what that does to you. The gaze is something that
if you’re studying film in college it would be a
shocker if it didn’t come across your classroom. And so it’s this idea of
what happens to a person who is on screen when
they’re being looked upon as an object rather
than just a person. And so particularly with
our film if that is done upon somebody how does
that change them? And so with the dancer in
our film we see sort of this split personality,
split psyche come about and this battling of who
takes precedence in the end. Are we able to continue to
claim our individuality and our autonomy? Or does the idea of being
looked upon as an object kind of overpower the
person that we are? ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Kevin Jakubowski: Today is
our 50th day of shooting. We have 60 days of
shooting in Iowa. It has really
been a blessing. I’m so happy we
came to Des Moines. 1994 was a great
time to be young. I’m Pete, this is
my buddy Rocco. Jakubowski: Play By Play
is a half hour coming of age comedy series about
an ESPN sportscaster who looks back on his life in
the ’90s and kind of does the play-by-play
of his adolescence. A little help. Her name was Alex Campbell
and she was beautiful, even in shin guards. Toby Louie: They call it
a digital series, we’re shooting it for Verizon
Go 90 which is a new streaming platform similar
to Netflix and Hulu. Huh? The ball, a little help. Yeah, sorry. Jakubowski: I had written
it to take place in Oak Park, Illinois, which
is where I went to high school. I was really sort of
adamant that it take place somewhere in the Midwest
and we make it look like Illinois and Iowa was the
place that we ended up. ♪♪ Max Amor:
Iowa, I love Iowa. Iowa is actually like a
breath of fresh air from LA honestly, it’s amazing. Ellee Jo Trowbridge: I
love Iowa, honestly I really love the whole
aspect of seasons and stuff. Marina Coria: The only
thing I don’t love is the weather. Louie: Obviously costs
are lower, locations specifically can be
a lot cheaper here. You could never double
Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles, a high school
like that doesn’t exist. And we have a crew of
about 60 I would say. There’s a transpo
department, there’s an art department, there’s a
camera department, there’s all the producers, there’s
casting, locations and all of these departments have
to work together in order to create the
final product. We do bring a lot of
people from Los Angeles and there is a good group
that we’ve been able to hire from Iowa and
that has been great. So we’ve been really lucky
to have a great Iowa-based crew as well. G. Thomas Furgerson: It’s
kind of cool to see people trying to get a feeling
for our work, it’s a much bigger animal than
people understand. I did the whole school of
hard knocks of learning how to do video and film
production starting at Iowa State. Iowa is definitely a good
place to be able to make shows. Coria: Our department
consists of three people. On bigger days we do bring
in some Iowa locals to help out with your
background and all of the football team and
the cheerleaders. Amor: For the actors in
this case if they’re under 18 and they’re still in
school they’re still required to do
school on set. That’s where the studio
teacher comes in. Trowbridge: He’s a really
good English teacher because I love English,
it’s my favorite subject. Yeah, he’s really sweet
and really nice and I dig him totally. Jakubowski: We’re in our
second and third seasons now of the show so a lot
of people from our first season are back so
we’re a little more of a well-oiled machine now. We kind of know what to
do and it has been great. ♪♪ Graham Cooper:
Atmanous is a film about a boy who suddenly sees all
of the options of his life in front of him and has
to decide which person he wants to be. Atmanous is a kind of
compound word that is from Atman, meaning selves, and
ous being just a suffix making it many selves. I like to go on road
trips, I like to kind of drive, which is what I’m
doing right now and there was one that I was doing
right after undergrad where I stopped in the
Smoky’s in Tennessee and I was camping by myself and
it was really a unique experience for me. I don’t usually
camp by myself. I love camping and that
was the first time and it just, it created the mood
of this film and that was like the first thing that
I felt was like this deep like strangeness
to the air. And so everything kind of
spawned from there and I started writing that day
at the camp by myself and that’s where the
story came from. Cooper: I like films that
evoke a mood and that leave you with that
mood afterwards. And I hope that viewers
can watch this film and leave but still
be in that world. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Hey! It’s swaying up there. ♪♪ ♪♪ Do you have water? (footsteps) (footsteps) (footsteps) Thank you. Look, if you guys need
something to eat we have a camp only a few
minutes away. I can heat up some
soup if you like. Yes please. That would be great. (nature sounds) Your son
doesn’t seem to like us much. I think it’s because
you look familiar. Me? Like his mother, younger,
but really close. I think it freaked
him out a little bit. Well, I hadn’t meant
to freak him out. I get that a lot, looking
like someone, don’t I? So you said you guys
came up from south? Outside of Roanoke,
checked for a while, this is our third day
on the trail. Did you expect to be
coming up this far? Sorry? It’s just that
you have no bags. Where are you
guys heading? Not anywhere specific,
just going really. We figured we always find
some nice people like you out here this
time of year. Do you have any salt? No, I don’t think so. Okay. I’m done. So I’m your mom? What? Your dad told me I
look like your mom. Is that why you
don’t like me? He’s not my dad. Oh. I’m sorry for assuming. Hey. Greg said we could
spend the night. He’s got some extra
sleeping bags. Sound good? ♪♪ (voices
talking over each other) (nature sounds and
music) (voices
talking over each other) (voices
talking over each other) ♪♪ ♪♪ It’s perfect. What should we call it? (nature sounds) (nature sounds) What
are you doing here? What do you mean? Where are you going? I don’t know, that’s a
pretty good question, Nate. Why don’t you know? Well, because we
think that’s okay. Who we were before, it
wasn’t working, so we’re going to find a new
home for a while. You’re homeless? For now, yeah. It’s a matter of not
being tied down, Nate. I’m not tied down. You are a little bit,
but you’re young, it’s expected. (music and footsteps) You all right there? Give me five. Take your time, it’s
beautiful up here. It really is. ♪♪ ♪♪ Thank you, Nate. (nature sounds) (nature sounds) (nature sounds) (nature sounds) (nature sounds) Ready to start packing? How did you get there? Get where? Seriously don’t do that. Do what? Don’t sneak up on me. I didn’t sneak up on you. At least I can get
along with people. You’re telling me I don’t
get along with people? Yup. Alright, those two people
here yesterday were cowards. They took their stuff
and left their homes. I get along with
people just fine. Do you even like me? Seriously? Yes I like you. You’re only here because
my mom made you. Oh, come on. I heard you two talking. That’s not true,
knock it off. You’re only here so
you can f— my mom. What the hell? Nate, what is
your problem? Huh? Nate? I can’t believe I’m
with another brat. I’m stuck with
another brat. Nate. Nate! (footsteps) Nate! (footsteps) Nate! Nate! (footsteps) Look, I’ll go, but
you’re coming with. No, this is for
the two of you. I don’t even know the
kid that well yet. That’s exactly
the point, Greg. Why won’t you
do this for me? That’s not it. I just think
it’s too soon. ♪♪ ♪♪ (laughter in the distance) Hey son. How are you feeling? You were in some
state this morning. Poor boy. Lin is getting some water. He’ll be back. Where am I? You know where, Nate. We walked past
it yesterday. We still have to name it. I’ll leave that up to you. How did you find me? You found us. There’s Lin. ♪♪ We were really
happy to see you, Nate. To be honest, I lost hope
you’d come to your senses. Ana didn’t, but I did. Alright, alright,
not too much. Greg and I had a fight. I believe it. Greg seemed like a fine
guy and all, but he wasn’t family. He doesn’t understand
a thing about you. He’s with my mom. You don’t have to worry
about any of that anymore. ♪♪ You’re
not my parents. I know it may not
seem right at first. I understand that. And I’m so sorry
I’ve been away. But with time, Nate, I
think you’ll come around to see me as your father. I need to find Greg. Nate, we’re deep
in the woods. I don’t think we could
find him even if we tried. Let’s find some food. How does that sound? I’m starving. I know the way back. Nate, your ankle, you
sprained it pretty bad. Here, come inside and rest
and try to clean up a bit. Let me help you up. Nate! Greg? He can’t see us. Why can’t he see us? Come inside, Nate. Go on, Nate. Nate! Lin! Don’t go. (nature sounds) Nate! ♪♪ Nate! ♪♪ Nate! Dad? Nate. Buddy, are you okay? I’m so sorry. Listen to me, okay, I
would never let anything happen to you, okay. Alright. Can we go home now? Yeah. Let’s get the
hell out of here. ♪♪ I’ve
got a good one. Why don’t we
call it our axis. Why? I don’t know, maybe our
home will take us in a new direction. I think I’ll think
of a better one. (laughs) Okay. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Nella Thomas: I think 1871
is just a revenge story and I don’t know, I never
thought of it that way. William Locker: It’s just
a good old, it’s a music video. It is a music video but
it is done with an epic western movie in mind. Thomas: A cinematic feel. Locker: And squeeze it in
three minutes, you know. Thomas: I think we were
inspired by Lonesome Dove and we didn’t
even know it. Locker: The first line
that popped up is — (singing) — and then she
started doing this — (singing) — and she’s
like, oh my gosh, this is awesome, we need to keep
going with this and see what happens. Thomas: We had talked at
one point like how cool would it be to be in a
Quentin Tarantino movie with this song? And then from there we
decided, let’s just make our own, we
don’t need him. Locker: Yeah, yeah, let’s
just focus on making our own western here in Iowa. Yeah. We made it happen just
through friends donating their time and talent
and just everyone coming together for a couple
of days of shooting. My buddy Stephan Hanson
is the wizard here in Des Moines, Iowa that can make
any idea I bring up happen and this western was a bit
of a challenge but we made it happen and it just kind
of all came together. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪The
cowboys around here don’t♪♪ ♪♪drink the water.♪♪ ♪♪They only got whiskey
in their blood.♪♪ ♪♪The cowboys around here
shot down my father.♪♪ ♪♪It’s been me and
my ma since 1871.♪♪ ♪♪One day you will see me
again, when you’re looking♪♪ ♪♪down the other end of my
barrel, I only need two♪♪ ♪♪shots.♪♪ ♪♪Your peril’s the only
thing that you got.♪♪ ♪♪And you’ll be gone like
the smoke of my gun in the♪♪ ♪♪air.♪♪ ♪♪See if I care when you’re
begging for your life and♪♪ ♪♪me to stop.♪♪ ♪♪I’m praying to watch
your sinful body rot.♪♪ ♪♪And you’ll be gone like
the smoke of my gun in the♪♪ ♪♪air.♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪The cowboys around♪♪ ♪♪here murdered my brother,
burned him down like a lit♪♪ ♪♪up cigarette.♪♪ ♪♪The cowboys around here
will pay for their♪♪ ♪♪slaughter.♪♪ ♪♪The sound of their spurs
is a curse I couldn’t♪♪ ♪♪forget.♪♪ ♪♪One day you will see me
again, when you’re looking♪♪ ♪♪down the other end of my
barrel, I only need two♪♪ ♪♪shots.♪♪ ♪♪Your peril’s the only
thing that you got.♪♪ ♪♪And you’ll be gone like
the smoke of my gun in the♪♪ ♪♪air.♪♪ ♪♪See if I care when you’re
begging for your life and♪♪ ♪♪me to stop.♪♪ ♪♪I’m praying to watch
your sinful body rot.♪♪ ♪♪And you’ll be gone like
the smoke of my gun in the♪♪ ♪♪air.♪♪ ♪♪And you’ll be gone like
the smoke of my gun in the♪♪ ♪♪air.♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪The cowboys around
here met my revolver.♪♪ ♪♪It’s been me and
my mama since 1871.♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Funding
for The Film Lounge has been provided by Produce
Iowa, state office of media production, building
a statewide network of support for the film
community in Iowa. More information on
how you can connect is available at
produceiowa.com. The Gilchrist Foundation,
founded by Jocelyn Gilchrist, furthering the
philanthropic interests of the Gilchrist family in
wildlife and conservation, medical care and social
services, the arts and public broadcasting
and disaster relief. Bravo Greater Des Moines,
investing in arts, culture and heritage non-profit
organizations throughout Central Iowa. And, Iowa Arts Council,
empowering Iowa to build and sustain culturally
vibrant communities by cultivating creativity,
learning and participation in the arts. Learn more at
iowaculture.gov.